Tag Archives: bursa

[Portfolio] What kinds of impacts did the pandemic have on indoor team sports? (‘Salon sporları pandemiden nasıl etkilendi?’)

Dear readers,

I apologize to those of you who follow me for my English content. My interview piece recently got published on the Hurriyet Newspaper. I am leaving this content here for those of you who can understand Turkish. I recently decided that I wanted to focus more on my freelancer career which explains why the blog has been quiter. Do not fret, I will return soon!

Hazal

[Summer Travel Series]: Apollonia, Apolyont, or Golyazi

I asked my fiancée whether he was up for a road trip on a flaming hot Sunday, and he said “why not”; so, we found some comfort in the air conditioning of his car and drove to what was called in the ancient time, the peninsula of Apollonia. Before I walk you through this small village that resides on the western shore of Lake Uluabat, a little history lesson shall be covered.

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‘Til I get a drone, thank you, Pinterest.

The History of the Peninsula

Due to the coins from as early as 450 BCE that were discovered in Apollonia, it is believed that the village was founded by Miletus in the ancient times. Some believe that the anchor symbol on the coin has something to do with its given name, others speak of a tale: The Bergama King Attalos II. gave the name of Queen Apollonis to the village. In the luwi language apa means water, ull means bushes, and wana means God; hence, the name resembles a combination of all. In ancient times, there were 9 other cities named Apollonia so, some refer to the village as Apolyont to distinguish it alongside its water source.

During its long history, Apollonia was under the control of the Byzantine Empire. However, Ottoman claimed the land in the 14th century; the architecture alongside the water carries the clashing influence of both cultures. Today, Apollonia is referred to as Golyazi (meaning ‘fisherwoman’) by the Nilufer Municipality of Bursa, and it’s both a historic site and home to its fishermen and villagers.

Before I forget, many thanks to my personal photographer Oğuzhan Tiryaki for capturing this authentic village, and helping me overcome my writer’s block without even realizing it. I might keep you full time.

The Tour Guide

  1. St. Panteleimon Church
  2. The Weeping Plane
  3. The Golyazi Lake
  4. Greek Ruins
  5. Ethnic Food

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Storytelling: On the flowing stream

What does it mean to be a storyteller? My lecturers discussed this a million times over the four years of my undergrad career. I call it a ‘career’ because I have been creating stories ever since I was eight, if not even earlier. Do you mind taking a walk with me through the memory lane? Even though I look like I’d prefer being alone while I do this, I still think I need company today.

I love bedtime stories, and I would use all of my little power to stay awake through those. Luckily, my dad had a million stories to tell. Every time he started a new story, he would reassure me saying that it is a really old tale and he is not making it up, because why would he? I would get mad at him because, after two or three years of hearing a new story every night, I think I was somehow too smart for a six-year-old, and I realized that they all told me the same thing over and over again: “You can explore, but listen to your parents when they warn you, or else you’ll get in trouble”. Oh, and no love interests, mom and dad will save you, there is no prince charming here!

But my dad was a professional. “Dad you are not making this up, right?”, “No, this was absolutely real”. The little black sheepdog always wondered what happened outside the farm. One day he decides to take a long walk, jumps across the fences and explores the endless fields. It suddenly starts getting darker, he is scared, and he hears a pack of big bad wolves howling. They get closer and form a circle around him, the little sheepdog is scared. His parents come and save him, later, getting mad at him a little bit but hugging him tight still. Dad, I miss your stories. I know you didn’t make any of them up.

If you thought my dad was an okay storyteller. Let me tell you about his mom, my grandma. Whatever she tells you, you are ought to believe her. She always had something in her voice that would make you feel like she is pulling you deep into this thought bubble that is inside her two hands. She was a magician playing with her words, and a bit of a witch, I am never sure if her hands are telling the story or casting a spell.

Oddly enough, her story never changed because she only had one. Her mother was adopted, had a very tough childhood but grew older to be a loving mother to my grandma. But this loving mother died too soon. I have seen my grandma pulling out a small photo of her mother from the very last drawer full of tablecloths, that is a part of an 80 some year-old dark brown wooden cabinet. Every time she pulled out the picture, she would blame herself for forgetting what her mother’s face looked like. She says she needs the picture to remember. I bet it hurts.

You remember the stream, dear? —  In the old town, it’s by our old home. – How can you not remember? – Well, I’ll take you there when we go. Oh, dear! – It was night time, very late. Maybe after 11 or 12. We had to sail through the river, so mom put me and my sister in a small wooden boat. And she was rowing and rowing. Oh! All of a sudden! – We saw a light from deep down. Oh, it was beautiful. It was shining and so bright that it hurt our eyes. My sister was younger, you know. And mom said to put our heads down. We put our heads down, but I peeked out on the side, mom didn’t see. Oh, it was so beautiful. A woman, she had ginger hair. It was so long. Her hair was like Leipzig silk! She was shining. She swam next to our small boat. Was it ever beautiful? – No, no. She didn’t hurt us or anything.

Then, what happened? We got off the boat and went home, but it was beautiful. I never told mom that I saw it!

But you are not lying? Right? How can you see it in the old town? Like here? Is it true?Maybe, I was dreaming, I don’t know. I was young. (She would shrug off her shoulders and move on with her life at this point, after charming me with the story. It was so cruel because I would think about it all night until I finally fell asleep).

There are things I wish I could remember better lately, and my mind won’t let me. But, can’t we all tell stories? All of the stories I heard, had a bit of those people that touched the narrator. And, no, my great grandma is not made up, but loving and gentle, just like in grandma’s story.

Dogs can talk, and mermaids are real – if only you believe.

 

Photo Credits: http://kopriyet.blogspot.com/2016/05/kirmasti-koprusu.html

[Photoblog] 2018 in Review: I did all this?

2018 was my ride or die. It was full of moments that left me in awe, put my capabilities in a trial, overwhelmed me with joy and with its last bit, challenged me with deep sadness as well.

I love the photoblogs because it has always been hard for me to see the small successes. As I looked through these moments, I said to myself, “I did all this?“. Believe me, there were a lot of question marks, not just one.

As always, thanks to the many friends I made along the way.

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[Photoblog] What you and I have been waiting for.

A quite hello from me,

I’ll try one more time. Hello. I miss writing here.

I have a lot that I have been holding close to my heart that I would like to share with you. I’ll try justify why I haven’t been able to pour myself out to Hazal’s Camera. My time in Washington, DC, came to an end. Just couple of weeks before I left the penthouse apartment, my one-year-old laptop let me down. Don’t even ask me about it, in the words of one of my favourite co-workers at the little organization I spent most of my days in DC: it was “tragic”. I left writing all together for a little longer than I would’ve liked, and embraced being upset about leaving yet another place– And, returning home.

So it is. I am torn into pieces, but I am also home to collect one that I left over here. With the courtesy of Hazal’s Camera, where I see things more clearly: Here is home.

Isn’t it lovely all alone?

Yesil Turbe

Side view of the Green Tomb (‘Yesil Turbe’). May 20, 2018

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The Green Tomb (‘Yesil Turbe’) entrance. May 20, 2018

Yesil Turbe

Looking out from within. May 20, 2018

A couple praying for the spirits of the Sultans who served in Bursa during the Ottoman era. May 20, 2018

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The Green Mosque

The Green Mosque.

The tomb was finished 40 days before the death of Celebi Sultan Mehmet (the 5th Ottoman Sultan). The tomb is also home for Celebi Sultan Mehmet’s daughters and sons, as well as Yildirim Beyazid’s son, Celebi Mehmet. May 20, 2018

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Flip the coin to the other side: Ataturk’s Turkey. May 19, 2018.

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Commemoration of Ataturk, Youth and Sports Day. May 19, 2018

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Tophane, top of the old historical Bursa. May 20, 2018

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The view from Tophane. May 20, 2018

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The new highway in process (view from Mudanya to M.Kemalpasa road) May 13, 2018

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Kids playing, view overseeing Trilye yacht marina. May 13, 2018