Tag Archives: documentary

[Review] BBC’s Sherlock Season 1 and 2, and Other Ratings on My Pandemic Media Consumption

If you read my previous blog post, the one that I literally published a few days ago, you are aware that writing has been difficult for me for a while. The soul (wink!) purpose of this blog has been to practice discernment in the way I consume media. Since the pandemic hit, I consumed a high volume of media but failed to talk about it. Well, let me elaborate… I have over five or six word documents in my desktop that consist of point-form notes about the films and series I watched. I simply left them hanging over there. I know, not cool. While I have zero motivation to review them all for you, I will write about an exceptional series, BBC’s Sherlock (2010-2017) and try to give you the full list of my media consumption with vague ratings down below. 

Hazal’s Film/TV Rating Point System

Smooth Writing and Transitions 2 points

Quality of Cinematography 2 points

Satisfactory Ending 2 points

Acting 2 points

On Screen Representation 0.5 points

Genre Compatibility 0.5 points

Soundtrack 0.5 points

Realism/CGI Effects (if applicable) 0.5

Now that you get the idea of how I rank media, you can have a look at my extensive consumption of film and tv productions as well as a few lonely books at the end of the list.

R* – stands for “re-watch”, a.k.a. seeing a production that I’ve seen before

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[Review] John Was Trying to Contact Aliens (2020): A Documentary Short

The title of the short is very intriguing that I added it to my list a long time prior to its official release. I watched it on Netflix (Turkey) just this morning, realizing it was about 16 minutes long and feeling a little disappointed that it was not a full-length documentary. Let’s get to the gist—I did not like it, and I’ll tell you why. [Note: Heavy spoilers!]

Credits: IMBD via Netflix, colors edited by Hazal’s Camera.

The documentary tells the story of a boy who is adopted by his grandparents upon his parents’ divorce. I do think this part is important because John mentions how his mother was “out of this world” with no more detail, and on the contrary, his grandparents are supportive of his unusual interests. There is also a small detail mentioned that John is gay, which, later finds its place in John’s story. So, John begins to use radio waves and airs cultural music (heavily instrumental selection of Indian, African, Jazz, etc. music) that reaches beyond the moon and towards the infinite space. After about 30 years of research, he quits, and, plot twist happens here: John finds true love.

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